Thongchai Thailand

A GLOBAL HEATING MENTAL ILLNESS

Posted on: December 1, 2020

Climate Anxiety and Mental Illness - Scientific American

THIS POST IS A CRITICAL REVIEW OF A GUARIDAN ARTICLE THAT SAYS THAT CLIMATE ACTION THAT WAS THOUGHT TO REQUIRE GLOBAL COORDINATION CAN NOW BE ADDRESSED INDIVIDUALLY BY CONCERNED PERSONS . LINK TO SOURCE: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/aug/04/what-can-you-do-to-fight-the-climate-crisis

Climate change and Public Health - Health Effects - Mental Health and  Stress-Related Disorders | CDC

PART-1: WHAT THE SOURCE ARTICLE SAYS

What can you do to fight the climate crisis? What’s one thing you do in your day-to-day life to combat the climate crisis?

A step forward for women fighting climate change | Oxfam

(1) Katharine Hayhoe, atmospheric scientist: I have transitioned over 80% of the talks I give to virtual online events (100% these days!), and when I do travel, I bundle my requests and commitments such that I am doing anywhere from 4-5 to as many as 15-25 events in each location that I fly to, in order to minimize the carbon footprint of each individual event. The US needs a national plan to cut carbon across the economy. In my opinion, that plan needs bipartisan support, to ensure it doesn’t just turn into a hot potato as administrations change. And it must address the injustices and inequities inherent to fossil fuel pollution and climate impacts.

Katharine Hayhoe Talks About Why Climate Change Is Real & Why She Still Has  Hope

(2) Adrienne Hollis, climate justice and health scientist: I am being mindful about the water shortage. I like to plant around my deck, and I use my rain barrel to water my plants. It’s a small thing, and it’s a big thing. I get up at about 6 to water my plants, and I grow my herbs and peppers. It makes me feel like I am making a difference. And feeling like you’re making a difference is important. It’s finding your way of contributing. It makes you feel like you’re a part of the fight. We need to be more proactive in conversing with our elected officials about renewable energy and the climate crisis. We also need to recognize the importance of our votes. Really ask yourself, “Who cares about me and the planet?” That doesn’t cost you anything, and it’s worth a little time especially if you don’t have money. You have your voice.

Adrienne L. Hollis – 2020 German American Conference at Harvard

(3) Sonia Aggarwal, energy policy expert: I recently found a great deal on a gently used electric car, and I have been loving it for those essential trips when I can’t walk, bike or use public transit. One thing I didn’t expect: this electric car is the most fun to drive! It’s peppy and quiet and it just feels so good to breeze right past the gas station without a second thought. Home energy use is responsible for 20% of US greenhouse gas emissions, between the electricity we use and the fuels we burn on site. There are some cool new technologies out there that can support the same or better service at home, while reducing energy use and emissions. Those include super-efficient heat pumps and new induction stoves that are safer than gas and offer the same or better temperature control. Many utilities and states offer rebates for appliances like these. Translation: I am not a climate scientist and I am not sure why I am included in this survey but maybe it’s because I drive an electric car. I have been heartened to see increased alignment on the essential policies and actions we need to reduce carbon across the economy and support good, family-sustaining jobs in the process. The most important political action we can each take is to get out and support local, state and federal leaders who will prioritize clean energy action – by voting and campaigning for these folks. Another often overlooked political opportunity lies with your Public Utilities Commission (PUC), a body that oversees electricity choices in each state. Each state PUC is led by just three to seven individuals – meaning only about 200 people preside over some of the most important questions facing America’s clean energy transition. Check out a PUC hearing and make your voice heard.

Sonia Aggarwal — The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment (C3E) Initiative

(4) Michael Mann, climatologist: I speak out about the climate crisis, and the importance of taking action, using every medium, vehicle, forum or platform that is available to me. This is what I do in my personal life to address the climate crisis. Reducing your carbon footprint via climate-friendlier lifestyle choices is certainly important. It sets a good example for others and can help make a dent in the problem. But the most important thing you can do is demand policy action and systematic change. Individuals can’t provide subsidies for clean energy or put a price on carbon, but governments can. We need politicians who will support climate-friendly policies. And we need to get rid of those who won’t. Voting is one critical way to do that, and if you live in the US, it’s absolutely critical that you vote on climate in the upcoming general election – from president all the way down to dogcatcher.

(5) Catherine Flowers, environmental justice leader: Use less plastic or no plastic, recycle, eat less meat, reduce our own carbon footprint, build better – there are lots of things we can do. Don’t buy unsustainable products, choose something else. That’s the quickest way to get people to change is to make another choice, then of course the market will adjust.

Born Country but Raised an Activist: Catherine Coleman Flowers of the Biden  Climate Task Force • Center for Earth Ethics

(6) Klaus Jacob, geophysicist: It’s fine to put solar panels on our roofs and take only a three-minute shower instead of a 10-minute shower. But what is really needed is that the individuals participate and communicate in neighborhood actions where you have the best chance to make a difference. I live in a small village on the Hudson river. As sea level rises, so does the Hudson. Over the last two decades, I have made sure that our village is one of the most aware that it is losing a good portion of its housing before the year 2050. We already have flooding on our streets.

Dr. Klaus Hans Jacob - Staff Profiles - The Earth Institute - Columbia  University

CRITICAL COMMENTARY

Watch Ozone Hole: How We Saved the Planet | Prime Video

ANTHROPOGENIC GLOBAL WARMING IS A GLOBAL ISSUE THAT REQUIRES A GLOBAL SOLUTION. THIS IS WHY THE UN WAS INVOLVED AND PUT IN CHARGE OF PUTTING TOGETHER A GLOBAL EMISSION REDUCTION PLAN AS THEY HAD DONE FOR THE OZONE IN THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL. THERE IS NO OPPORTUITY HERE FOR CLIMATE HEROISM BY INDIVIDUAL NATION STATES AND CERTAINLY NO OPPORTUNITY HERE FOR CLIMATE HEROISM OF INDIVIDUALS HOWEVER SCIENTIFIC OR HOWEVER CONCERNERD OR HOWEVER SCARED THEY MAY BE.

THIS IS NOT AN EMOTION THING. IT IS EITHER A COORDINATED GLOBAL ACTION THING OR IT IS NOTHING.

Tears outside PM's office as students skip school to demand climate action  again - ABC News

REFERENCE#1: RELATED POST ON THE NEED FOR A COORDINATED GLOBAL RESPONSE: https://tambonthongchai.com/2020/05/22/climate-catch22/

REFERENCE#2: IPCC CALL FOR GLOBAL CLIMATE ACTION: https://www.ipcc.ch/site/assets/uploads/sites/2/2019/05/SR15_Approval_Chapter_4.pdf

REFERENCE#3: FAILURE OF A CLIMATE ACTION PLAN WITHOUT GLOBAL COORDINATION AND WITHOUT AN ENFORCABLE GLOBAL CARBON BUDGET: https://tambonthongchai.com/2020/04/04/11245/

REFERENCE#4: THE MONTREAL PROTOCOL AS A MODEL FOR A GLOBALLY COORDINATED CLIMATE ACTION PLAN WITH A GLOBAL CARBON BUDGET. https://tambonthongchai.com/2020/11/18/climate-alarms-of-11-18-2020/

Watch Ozone Hole: How We Saved the Planet | Prime Video

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