Thongchai Thailand

Moral compass

Posted on: May 14, 2010

Bernard Trink quotes James Rollins to ask why we have magnets in our brain (Book Reviews, Bangkok Post, May 14, 2010) as if that were a mystery. It used to be one but now scientists report that if you wave a magnet near the right TPJ section of our brain it impairs our moral judgement of other people’s behavior. They conclude that the magnets must therefore have a moral judgement function. The media has been quick to label the magnetic property of the TPJ a ” moral compass”.

Cha-am Jamal, Thailand

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